boy in white shirt sitting on chair and playing on computer

Tips & Tricks for Getting Your Child Off the Computer Screen

Balancing a child’s screen time with other activities is challenging for many parents. As the digital world becomes increasingly engaging, finding ways to draw children’s attention to the tangible world around them is crucial. The abundance of online games, videos, and interactive apps can be all-consuming, often overshadowing traditional hobbies and pastimes. However, it’s essential []

limit screen time

4 Strategies to Help Avoid Conflict With Your Teens When Limiting Screen Time

Teenagers are spending more time on their phones and computers than ever before — and so is everyone else. Whether or not they’ll admit it, teens look to their parents as role models and many modern parents are setting the example that it’s not OK to be bored. Overall, it’s how your teens use their devices that matter most. Here’s how to avoid conflict with your teens when setting screen time boundaries.

child's screen time

Simple Ways for Limiting Your Child’s Screen Time

These days, kids are getting access to smartphones and iPads at an early age. According to the AACAP, on average kids ages, 8-12 spend 4-6 hours a day using screens while teens spend up to 9 hours. This can cause negative side effects. Research suggests that excess screen time can be linked to obesity, irregular sleep patterns, behavioral problems, and impaired performance at school.

screen time for small children

How to Moderate Screen Time for Small Children

Gen Z and Gen Alpha children grow up with a constant companion: screens. Even if they don’t get to have their own for a long time, they’ll most likely have at least on TV, a few LapTops, Desktops, phones, and tablets surrounding them at all times, constantly tying down their attention. These screens, technologies, and gadgets are not only a distraction for the children but an invitation for the parents to make dealing with them easier. If they’re tired, fussy, or just loud and in the way, they’re stuck in front of the TV, or given a tablet or a phone as an “easy way out”.